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Chef Works to Serve as Official Culinary Apparel Provider for Hawai’i Food and Wine Festival

Company Celebrates State’s Culinary Richness with Custom Chef Coats Featuring Local Fabrics from Hawaiian Print Originator Reyn Spooner -

San Diego (August 2015) – Chef Works, a leading provider of culinary apparel to professional chefs and home cooks alike, announces its participation in the fifth annual Hawai’I Food & Wine Festival (HFWF), to be held August 29 – September 13.  A partner of the event since its inaugural year, Chef Works celebrates this year’s event with custom-designed chef coats featuring local fabrics from the originator of Hawaiian aloha print shirts, Reyn Spooner, in the cuffs and sleeves.

As HFWF’s official culinary apparel sponsor, the company will be outfitting the event’s 100+ participating chefs for a week’s worth of cooking demos, private dining experiences, culinary tours and more spanning across the Big Island, Maui, Honolulu and Oahu.

“The brainchild of two of Hawaii’s most esteemed chefs, Roy Yamaguchi and Alan Wong, the Hawai’I Food & Wine Festival is the ultimate showcase of the state’s top culinary talent and local foods.  Chef Works is proud to have been a part of this expansive event since the beginning and have created exclusive chef coats in partnership with Reyn Spooner as a special thank you to the local chefs who have shown our brand so much Hawaiian hospitality over the past five years,” stated Amanda Stuckey, Marketing Director of Chef Works.

About Chef Works

Chef Works, Inc. is a worldwide culinary apparel manufacturing and distribution solution for the culinary, hotel, restaurant and food service industries. Offering cost-effective and efficient alternatives for companies of all sizes, Chef Works is the leader in uniform supply management, brand continuity, online ordering, on-site embroidery, personalized reporting, budget coordination and uniform design and distribution. Chef Works successfully manufactures and distributes culinary apparel in over 60 countries. They remain resolute in their mission to provide the best-quality products at the most competitive prices, focusing all of their efforts to ensure complete satisfaction and meet, or exceed, expectations for high-quality, well-designed, comfortable uniforms alongside superior customer service. For more information, visit www.chefworks.com.

About the Hawai’i Food & Wine Festival 

The Hawai‘i Food & Wine Festival is the premier epicurean destination event in the Pacific.  Set in the lush island paradise of Hawai‘i, the Festival will take place over two weeks on multiple islands, featuring a roster of over 100 internationally-renowned master chefs, culinary personalities, and wine and spirit producers. Co-founded by two of Hawai‘i’s own James Beard Award-winning chefs, Roy Yamaguchi and Alan Wong, the Festival in Hawai‘i Island, Maui, Honolulu, and Ko Olina Resort will showcase wine tastings, cooking demonstrations, one-of-a-kind excursions, and exclusive dining opportunities with dishes highlighting the state’s bounty of local produce, seafood, beef and poultry.

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Inspiration: See The Food and People That Inspired These Chefs

Being a chef is more than simply a profession. It is passion; it is inspiration; it is a living art form assaulting the senses; different but no less profound than a beautiful painting or a timeless work of literature.

As is the case with any artist, inspiration is a key ingredient in the making of any great chef. It percolates in youth and builds around the family dinner table.  

The sights, smells, tastes and love builds a yearning to create shared warmth and memories with a shared experience.

Inspired by the greatest chefs of all – mom and dad – culinary pros learn that a great meal can be more than just good food.  It can be a gateway to the heart.

We interviewed 10 outstanding culinary artists to find out what and who inspired them in their youth to be the great chefs they’ve become.

1. Andrew Spurgin

Twitter: @AndrewSpurgin

With 30 years of culinary experience in designing menus for parties, and producing bespoke events, Andrew consults world class restaurants, hotels, and events. Andrew has cooked for three U.S. presidents, Martha Stewart, and at the James Beard House in New York City.

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What’s your favorite dish? 

I love whole fish, or practically anything, baked in salt or a salt dough crust. I will even do whole chicken with straw in salt dough. This method of cooking is beyond flavorful, as it captures ALL the essence of the product. Salt Crusted Abalone pictured below.

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10 Common Mistakes to Avoid when Making Whipped Cream

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(Source: Flickr)

Is there anything dreamier than freshly whipped cream? When whipped cream is prepared well, it is an ambrosial foodstuff that has the power to make any dessert it tops even better, from ice cream sundaes to pie to hot chocolate. Of course, I’m not averse to enjoying it on a spoon, all by its delicious self.

Whipped cream doesn’t always turn out so well, though. When made poorly, whipped cream can come out grainy and separated, too sweet or not sweet enough, or too thin and messy. However, in spite of these possible pitfalls, making whipped cream is not a kitchen project fraught with peril: once you master the basics, you’ll be on your way to making perfect whipped cream every time.

What is whipped cream? In a nutshell, whipped cream is heavy cream which has been whipped until it becomes light and fluffy. Chemically speaking, what happens when you whip cream is that the air gets trapped between a sort of network of fat droplets, and the cream becomes fluffy and roughly doubled in volume.

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(Source: Flickr)

10 Common Mistakes to Avoid when Making Whipped Cream. Often enough, when whipped cream goes awry, it’s due to one of these common mistakes. Here, we’ll discuss each of them and how to easily remedy them so that you can make the smooth, creamy whipped cream of your dreams, every time.

  1. You don’t chill your cream. This is probably the number one rookie mistake when making whipped cream. The cream must be cold when you start, or it will not whip correctly.

If the cream is too warm, the fat becomes ineffective as a stabilizer, and your cream will fall flat. The cream may thicken, but even vigorous whipping will not make it attain lofty heights and a fluffy texture.

For best results, don’t just chill the cream: chill the bowl you’ll use for whipping and the whisk or beater, as well.

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(Source: Flickr)

  1. You don’t use the right kind of cream. If you go to the grocery store dairy aisle, you’ll find a multitude of cream types. Light cream. Heavy cream. Heavy whipping cream. Which is the best to use?

The best options, according to Grub Geek, are heavy cream and heavy whipping cream, which both contain 36% or more butterfat. Whipping cream (the non “heavy”) kind contains a little less fat, but still enough to be whipped. Basically, any cream with 30% or more butterfat will whip.

Of course, if you’re vegan, don’t despair: dairy alternatives that have a high fat content, such as coconut cream, can also be used to create whipped cream.

Half and half and milk (even whole milk) does not work for whipping, as they do not contain enough fat to hold bubbles of air between its fat molecules.

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(Source: Flickr)

  1. You don’t add the sweetener at the proper moment. Do you add sugar to your cream right when you start mixing? Next time, hold off. Sugar can actually inhibit the cream from thickening, so it’s best to allow the cream to gain some thickness and structure before you add any sweetener or flavoring.

If you look at recipes for whipped cream, they’ll often request that you whip the cream until soft peaks form, then pause to add your flavoring or sweetener, then whip until firm peaks form. Follow these steps for perfect results every time.

  1. You add the wrong amount of sweetener. While the wrong amount of sugar might not ruin your whipped cream, it might not yield the flavor experience you were hoping for.

Too little sugar can yield a whipped cream that doesn’t add enough sweetness to your dessert. For instance, if you’re topping fresh fruit with whipped cream and it doesn’t have enough sweetener, there won’t be enough of a sweet contrast, and it’s not going to taste like dessert. Using two to four tablespoons of sugar per cup of whipping cream is a good balance for a sweet whipped cream.

On the other hand, a thickly sweetened dish such as an ice cream sundae or butterscotch pudding doesn’t need too much sweetness, and a whipped cream with a couple of teaspoons of sugar, or no sweetener at all, may be the best way to go.

Consider the dish you’ll be topping with whipped cream, and sweeten accordingly.

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(Source: Flickr)

  1. You don’t use the proper whisking utensil. If you try to use a wooden spoon to make whipped cream, your results will definitely not be as fluffy and light as you’d like. In general, you want to use a tool which is going to incorporate plenty of air into the cream. A whisk is an ideal tool; personally, I like to use an electric mixer with a whisk attachment so I don’t wear out my arm.

A hand whisk will also work to whip cream, but it will take much longer than a whisk beater on a stand or hand mixer.

  1. You don’t stabilize your whipped cream in hot weather. No matter how perfectly your whipped cream is made, if it is hot and humid out, it will wilt and melt. Adding a stabilizer to your whipped cream can help it maintain structure in the heat and humidity.

There are a number of different ways to stabilize whipped cream; this post details several, including adding marshmallow fluff or butter to the mixture.

  1. You over whip. It’s easy to progress from perfectly whipped cream to a grainy mess–and fast. So how do you know when it’s time to stop?

The moment to stop is exactly when the cream has reached your desired consistency. The way that cream whips is like so: first it thickens, then it attains “soft peaks” (if you swirl it with a spoon it will gently hold the shape), and then it gets lighter and attains “firm peaks” (if you twirl it with a spoon it retains its shape firmly).

Anywhere from the soft peak to the firm peak stage is acceptable for whipped cream–you can whip it to your preference. However, stop mixing once the mixture has attained firm peaks, because after that point, the fat solids will begin to separate, making your mixture grainy.

If you do in fact over whip your cream, unfortunately there is no way to undo the error, but don’t throw the cream away–keep on whipping and you can actually make homemade butter.

  1. You try to make it in a rush. Whipped cream is a quick dish to make, but be sure to set aside the time so that you can give it the proper attention. First things first: chill your cream. This means that if you’ve bought it then ran a few errands, it’s going to need a few hours in the refrigerator to come back to a chilly temperature. Be sure that you have time to pay attention to your whipped cream.

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(Source: Flickr)

  1. You’re eager to use your whipped cream…right away. But if you put it on top of a brownie that is still warm, your whipped cream will melt. If your dessert isn’t quite ready for the whipped cream, put the whipped cream in the refrigerator. It will keep just fine for several hours.

Conclusion: Making perfect whipped cream might seem tricky at first, but by learning from these common mistakes, you’re already ahead of the curve. By giving your whipped cream the time, attention, and using the proper tools, you’ll end up with great results every time.

Do you like whipped cream on top of desserts?

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Classic v. Contemporary Fashion in the Kitchen

Chefs are deviating from the practical, white, classic look, bringing their own style to the kitchen. Modern fashion in the kitchen brings all of the practical aspects of the classic look with more tailored styles, new fabrics, and colors. Chefs have never had so many options for hats, aprons, jackets and pants. Chefs can now let their style shine through while maintaining the safety and practicality of the classic uniform.

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Chef Works To Serve as Official Culinary Apparel Provider for 5th Annual LA Food & Wine Festival

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Chef Works is proud to be an official sponsor of the Los Angeles Wine and Food Festival. Be on the lookout for the release of our new styles

LAFW Embroidery from Chef Works on Vimeo.

Company to Unveil Several New Design During LA’s Premier

Culinary Event and Official After Party -

Los Angeles (August 27-30th, 2015) – For the fifth consecutive year, Chef Works, a leading provider of culinary apparel to professional chefs and home cooks alike, will serve as the official culinary apparel sponsor of the 2015 Los Angeles Food & Wine Festival, to be held August 27-30. The company will also host the LAFW after party, during which it will officially unveil several additions to it broad collection of stylish apron, chef coat, and kitchen/front-of-house shirt offerings.

Throughout the event, Chef Works will be outfitting all participating chefs in its new men’s and women’s Springfield short-sleeved lite twill coat as well as its new Corvallis, Rockford, Austin, and Dorset aprons, all of which will be embroidered with the LAFW logo. As with previous years, the Los Angeles Food & Wine Festival will serve as a celebration of Southern California’s rich culinary scene, featuring demos, seminars, and private dining experiences with such chefs are Curtis Stone, Michael Chiarello, Elizabeth Falkner, Tyler Florence, Alex Guarnaschelli, Thomas Keller, and Jet Tila, among others.

“Since its debut five years ago, Chef Works has been a proud sponsor of the Los Angeles Food and Wine Festival. As such, we could think of no better venue for the unveiling of our new 2015/2016 line of cutting edge culinary apparel. Throughout the event, we will be showcasing several of these designs by outfitting many of the culinary professionals who support our brand day in and day out. Equally, we will be celebrating these individuals and their culinary talents at a special after hours launch party,” stated Amanda Stuckey, Marketing Director of Chef Works. 

About Chef Works

Chef Works, Inc. is a worldwide culinary apparel manufacturing and distribution solution for the culinary, hotel, restaurant and food service industries. Offering cost-effective and efficient alternatives for companies of all sizes, Chef Works is the leader in uniform supply management, brand continuity, online ordering, on-site embroidery, personalized reporting, budget coordination and uniform design and distribution. Chef Works successfully manufactures and distributes culinary apparel in over 60 countries. They remain resolute in their mission to provide the best-quality products at the most competitive prices, focusing all of their efforts to ensure complete satisfaction and meet, or exceed, expectations for high-quality, well-designed, comfortable uniforms alongside superior customer service. For more information, visit www.chefworks.com.

About the Los Angeles Food & Wine Festival

The Los Angeles Food & Wine Festival, presented with generous support from founding partners FOOD & WINE, Lexus, The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas, JENN-AIR, and Delta Airlines, is a four-day epicurean event showcasing the finest in food and drink culture throughout Los Angeles, and culinary personalities from throughout the country. Set amidst one of the country’s foremost cultural destinations along Grand Avenue, the event spans the city and offers guests the chance to sample the cuisines and products from some of the most prominent epicurean influencers, while enjoying the sights and sounds of the entertainment industry’s brightest talents.

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11 Common Mistakes to Avoid When Making Scrambled Eggs

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(Source: Flickr)

Scrambled eggs were one of the first dishes I learned how to cook. While it’s not hard to make scrambled eggs, as I have learned over the years, the difference between ho-hum and spectacular versions is a matter of subtle technique.

Perfect scrambled eggs are all about nuances: the heat of your pan, the quality of your eggs, the tools you use. By refining your techniques and tools, you can reduce the likelihood of over-dry or snotty-textured eggs, instead getting perfect, golden, creamy eggs every time.

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7 Common Mistakes to Avoid When Making Salmon

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(Source: Flickr)

When I moved from New York City to Seattle in my early twenties, one of the biggest culinary culture shocks was the ubiquity and regional reverence to salmon. Salmon is a big deal in the Pacific Northwest, where savvy chefs have perfected the art of cooking this unique pink fish.

Having never taken the time to appreciate salmon beforehand, I quickly became a connoisseur. I came to appreciate the benefits of wild salmon, and learned the ins and outs of preparing this assertively flavored yet surprisingly delicate fish.

Plenty of people love the flavor and proven health benefits that come along with eating salmon. Few people, however, enjoy underdone, poorly prepared, or just plain “fishy” salmon. Here, we’ll talk about how to avoid common pitfalls so that you can have spectacular salmon every time.

How do people cook salmon? There’s more than one way to cook this upstream-swimming fish. Chefs employ a variety of cooking techniques to prepare salmon, including but not limited to pan-frying, grilling, and poaching (a method of cooking in a thin layer of boiling liquid which is often used for eggs, too). The tips in this roundup are designed to be relevant regardless of your preparation technique.

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Baked Flounder with Tomatoes and Basil

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When I first started cooking, fish was a mystery to me. It tasted delicious in a restaurant, but whenever I tried to cook it at home, it either stuck to my pan, turned rubbery, or both. It was frustrating because not only is seafood expensive where I live, but there’s nothing worse than reading a recipe that sounds amazing, only to be majorly disappointed with the results.

I’ve since learned that cooking fish is actually easy if you know the right technique, and in certain cases, such as this baked flounder dish, the only thing you really have to worry about is not overcooking the fish.

Sourcing Ingredients. The first step towards making an excellent dish is finding the right ingredients. Especially in a dish that has only a few ingredients, such as this one, you want to make sure you’re buying the highest quality products you can find.

Start with the fish. Depending on where you are located, your options for high quality seafood may not be plentiful. When buying fish, you should seek out a place that sells the freshest fish available in your area. A local fish market is generally going to be a better choice than just picking up a package from your supermarket’s seafood case.

Fresh fish should be firm and dry, and should smell clean and briny, not fishy. It should remind you of the ocean. If you’re looking at filets that are slimy or grayish in color, you should buy elsewhere. You should buy fish on the day you plan on cooking it, no matter where you buy it. You can use it the next day if you must, but any longer than that and you risk losing quality and flavor, in addition to increasing your risk of foodborne illness.

Store the fish in the coldest part of your refrigerator until you are ready to use it. You can freeze it if you’d like, but thaw in the refrigerator for several hours before cooking.

For this recipe, you’ll be using fresh tomatoes, which are best purchased in season from a local source. You want them to taste sweet and jammy when baked, not mealy and watery like a lot of grocery store tomatoes taste. If you can’t get local in season tomatoes, canned are a better option. Cherry tomatoes work best in this recipe, as they will respond nicely to the high heat. Store fresh tomatoes at room temperature for best flavor and texture; never in the fridge.

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How to Open a Restaurant

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Restaurants are one of the most popular businesses to open these days, and it seems like no matter where you go, there’s a new one opening up on every corner. With over six times the number of restaurants today as there were a few decades ago, it’s a risky venture for sure, but if you do it right, you can be successful.

Understand What You’re Getting Into.  Before you do anything else, it’s important to understand that opening a restaurant isn’t as easy as it may seem judging by the number of restaurants out there these days. There’s a certain allure about creating an amazing menu and listening to your customers rave about how good your food is, but a lot goes on behind the scenes that isn’t quite so glamorous.

For one thing, it’s expensive. Besides rent, you’ll have to buy expensive equipment to get started. Commercial kitchen equipment is designed to be in use for hours on end every single day, and it’s much more expensive than anything you’ll put into a home kitchen. When you factor in everything else you need to be up and running, you can easily spend six figures before you open your door. Inventory can also be expensive, especially when you factor in the fact that if you don’t use it, you’ll lose it.

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10 Common Mistakes to Avoid when Cooking Steaks

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(Source: Flickr)

Steak is not something I eat every day, but when I do treat myself, it’s a wonderful luxury: unctuous, flavorful meat, ideally served with a compound butter and a glass of dry red wine to “cut” through the richness of the meat.

When I enjoy a steak, I want it to be cooked right. Unfortunately, steak is all too often not cooked properly, and turns out over or under-done, flavorless or stringy. Not exactly a treat. Fortunately, you can prevent these pitfalls in your own kitchen once you’ve learned some key cooking tips for preparing steak.

What makes a good steak? While what constitutes a “good” steak can be up to some debate, there are certain characteristics that most will agree play into a fine steak experience. First, the meat has to be of good quality, from a reputable source. It should have a nice bit of marbling, enough to make the flavor interesting, but not too much that the meat is too chewy or fatty. It should have a perfectly seared exterior, and tender interior.

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